Category: Interesting

The Last Notes

The skeletons found in Oxford would be of Viking mercenaries

The skeletons found in Oxford would be of Viking mercenaries

The skeletons discovered in Oxford city center could be the remains of Viking looters rather than settlers killed in the famous Brice Massacre. Experts believe that the group of 37 men whose remains were found in St Giles four years ago could be mercenaries attacking Oxford.

Expedition underway to recover works of art stolen by the Nazis

Expedition underway to recover works of art stolen by the Nazis

An expedition in the best Indiana Jones style has been formed in Germany to recover lost works of art valued at 500 million pounds that were looted by the Nazis during World War II.Works by Monet, Manet, Cezanne and other artists, as well as sculptures, rugs and tapestries they are believed to be buried in an old silver mine on the Czech-German border, a 90-minute drive from the city of Dresden.

Causes of World War II

Causes of World War II

The causes of the Second World War are not simple to understand, as they are generally not those of any war. Although we can say that they were predictable, it was something that no one was taken by surprise. There is a vast documentary collection on World War II, the most complete material that had been had to date on a conflict of such characteristics.

Results of the study of the small Siberian mammoth Yuka

Results of the study of the small Siberian mammoth Yuka

The carcass of a small, woolly mammoth, very well preserved thanks to the permanent cold of Siberia, has been examined by an international team of scientists from the Russian Academy of Sciences in Yakutsk, who have found evidence that the animal was shot down by predators, probably lions, and then preyed upon by the greatest predator of all, man.

Almoneda at IFEMA, from April 14 to 22

Almoneda at IFEMA, from April 14 to 22

From today April 14 until the 22 of this month, the 22nd Antiques, Art Galleries and Collecting Fair will be held at IFEMA: Almoneda, where the largest offer of objects with History with a minimum of 50 years of history meets. Antiquity. Approximately 130 antique dealers, galleries and auction houses that arrive from all over Spain and neighboring countries, will show their more than 25.

Pompeii gets funding from the Italian government

Pompeii gets funding from the Italian government

The Italian government has launched a 105 million euro project to save one of the world's greatest archaeological treasures, the ancient city of Pompeii. There has been growing concern that the site, where volcanic ash buried the Roman city in AD 79, has been neglected.

The last Alutiiq kayak from 1860 gives clues to this Alaskan culture

The last Alutiiq kayak from 1860 gives clues to this Alaskan culture

Around 1860 near Kodiak Island, off the southern coast of Alaska, an Alutiiq warrior built a simple kayak by stretching and stitching the skins of female sea lions, around a sophisticated wooden frame. The warrior and whaler gave his kayak had a forked bow, which favored his people to navigate through the rough seas of the Gulf of Alaska to hunt whales with large harpoons.

The Treaty of Versailles of 1919

The Treaty of Versailles of 1919

There are many causes that led Europe to be the epicenter of the bloodiest war with the most deaths in history: World War II, but the most important was the Treaty of Versailles. It is true that we must also take into account from the beginning rise of totalitarianism, whether fascist or communist, through German expansionism and British colonialism, until the crisis of 1929.

The centenary of the sinking of the Titanic brings out new theories about the accident

The centenary of the sinking of the Titanic brings out new theories about the accident

A hundred years have passed since the sinking of the Titanic, the most famous ocean liner in history, and there are still mysteries to unravel. In recent days, the debate has reopened as to whether the ship's collision was due to human error or, on the contrary, something inevitable. Many theories sound like fantasy and others are more realistic.

Biography of Napoleon Bonaparte: soldier, emperor and son of the Revolution

Biography of Napoleon Bonaparte: soldier, emperor and son of the Revolution

Napoleon Bonaparte was born on August 15, 1769 in Ajaccio (Corsica) into a family of notable Corsicans. History would end up knowing him by the Frenchified name and would forget that he was originally called Napoleone di Buonaparte. He studied military in France and linked his military career to the French Revolution, which earned him the nickname "Son of the Revolution."

Lamb Spring and Signs of North America's First Humans

Lamb Spring and Signs of North America's First Humans

Molly the mammoth lived, grazed and died about 13,000 years ago near a spring that is today a highly developed part of Douglas County. 5,000 years later, the first North American humans spent time at that same spring, where they killed and slaughtered bison. We don't know if humans visited the spring at the same time as Molly, but we do know that the Lamb Spring site offers evidence that they did, and hopefully, the place could rewrite the scientific and cultural history of North America, and perhaps offer the Denver area a new attraction.

Lids of Egyptian sarcophagi seized in Israel

Lids of Egyptian sarcophagi seized in Israel

Inspectors from the Israel Antiquities Authorities recently seized two lids from Egyptian sarcophagi that in the past contained ancient mummies. The covers were confiscated by inspectors from the Antiquities Theft Prevention Unit while inspecting shops in the market square of the Old City of Jerusalem.

Swiss archaeologists want to confirm the body of Swiss hero Jürg Jenatsch

Swiss archaeologists want to confirm the body of Swiss hero Jürg Jenatsch

A group of researchers has reopened a tomb in Switzerland to see if DNA tests can confirm that it contains the body of 17th century hero and killer Jürg Jenatsch. Jenatsch is believed to have been buried under the flagstones of the Chur Cathedral (Switzerland). In 1959, the anthropologist Erik Hug exhumed a body, which he identified as Jenatsch's on the basis of the clothes he was wearing and the large blow to his skull.

II Conference Meetings with Clío: Time of crisis

II Conference Meetings with Clío: Time of crisis

On April 26, the II Conference Meetings with Clío will be held at the Center for Human and Social Sciences (CSIC), organized by young researchers from the Institute of History and where different areas of our past are discussed. The occasion will be titled "Time of crisis", divided into two areas or discussion tables: Table 1: Great historical transformations and their interpretation.

Biography of Henry VIII: a reign marked by his love life

Biography of Henry VIII: a reign marked by his love life

One of the best known English kings is Henry VIII. He became famous not only for his political work that distanced him from the Catholic Church and the Vatican, but it was his marriages and his obsession with conceiving an heir that has made him so well known throughout the centuries. on June 28, 1491 in Greenwich, England, the fruit of the marriage between King Henry VII and Elizabeth of York.

The six wives of Henry VIII of England

The six wives of Henry VIII of England

Henry VIII of England wielded the most absolute power among all the English monarchs, but he is also famous for having been married six times to well-known women throughout history.He was not only King of England, but also Lord of Ireland until his death . He was a large man, an athlete, energetic and extremely intelligent.

The temple of Hathor restored in File

The temple of Hathor restored in File

East of the famous temple of Isis on the island of Phile in Upper Egypt, workers and archaeologists are hard at work. They are cleaning and restoring the massive stone blocks that once made up the Temple of Hathor, which is being rebuilt and restored with the goal of opening next month.

Historic settlement discovered in Pakistan

Historic settlement discovered in Pakistan

Some 224 artifacts dating back to the 5th century have been discovered in a 25-foot-high mound in Sangalwala, Tibia village, 12 kilometers from Kamalia in the Toba Tek Singh district, Pakistan. These include clay bowls, animal and human figures, clay beads, iron household items, copper coins, bracelets, and stone objects.

A new study shows that Marco Polo did make it to China

A new study shows that Marco Polo did make it to China

An in-depth study of Chinese sources carried out by the University of Tübingen (Germany), dispels doubts as to whether the explorer Marco Polo actually reached China. It has been claimed that Marco Polo did not actually make it to China, but instead compiled his information through what merchants told him and what he read on his travels to the Black Sea, Constantinople, and Persia.

Ancient Greek temple discovered in Messinia

Ancient Greek temple discovered in Messinia

An archaeological investigation has revealed an ancient temple in the mountains between Ilia and Messinia, in front of the well-known temple of Apollo Epicurus. The area around the newly discovered temple, was full of architectural tools that were used to build a small temple, while the Former head of the 38th Ephorate of Antiquities, archaeologist Xeni Arapogianni, explains that when the small temple was demolished to build a new one, masts, triglyphs and other parts of an ancient temple were found.