Board Game from Sam'al

Board Game from Sam'al


22 of the Most Popular Board Games in the US and the History Behind Them

Whether stuck at home for a weekend, 10 days, or indefinitely, board games are an easy way to add some fun to a person’s days. There’s a wide range of board games available — from ancient games that are based on nothing but luck to new cult-favorite strategy games.

24/7 Tempo compiled a list of more than 20 of the most popular board games in history after reviewing lists of the best-rated and best-selling board games by various gaming e-commerce publications and sites.

Challenge yourself to put away the screens and other electronics and gather with your family – and possibly your p andemic pod — for a good old-fashioned board game. Some of the best board games are for kids, though adults may enjoy them as well, and others are more for the adult members of the family. Some only require two players, while others can accommodate a number of players.

When you are ready to get back to the screen, instead of binging on TV shows, you can keep working on your strategy skills with video games — these are the 20 best-selling video games of all time .


10 Ticket to Ride

train ride across the country while they collect cards of various types of trains which allow them to own railway routes between different locations. The game is simple to learn but requires great strategy and tactics to win. The longer the train routes each player claims means the more points they accumulate.

There is also a selection of &ldquodestination tickets,&rdquo which allow players to earn bonus points. To put it basically, each turn, you draw more cards, claim a route, or get a destination ticket. Don&rsquot tell the kids, but it&rsquos also educational. Everyone can brush up&mdashor learn&mdashtheir geography. There are also versions where you can build your routes throughout Europe, Scandinavia, and Africa. It&rsquos a high-quality, modern game that everyone in the family can enjoy! Better get tracking! [1]


Contents

From two to four players collect tiles to fill up a 5x5 squares player board. [1] Players collect tiles by taking all the tiles of one colour from a repository, or from the centre of the table, and placing them in a row, taking turns until all the tiles for that round are taken. [2] At that point, one tile from every filled row moves over to each player's 5x5 board, while the rest of the tiles in the filled row are discarded. [3] Each tile scores based on where it is placed in relation to other tiles on the board. [4] Rounds continue until at least one player has made a row of tiles all the way across their 5x5 board. Additional points are awarded at the end of the game for each complete row or column, and for each instance of all five tiles of the same colour being collected.

The basic game dictates where tiles of each color go on their player board, while an advanced version allows players to place them anywhere. [5]

Keith Law, writing for Paste Magazine, said "The theme doesn't really tie into or matter for the game play, but the artwork is just fantastic and. will give Azul a ton of shelf appeal in a market where maybe publishers don't pay as much attention to that aspect of marketing." [1]

Nate Anderson of Ars Technica described it as "an ideal weeknight game, or a game night opener, or a family title." [6]

Emily VanDerWerff, writing for Vox, said "Azul has made the leap from hardcore hobbyist circles to the shelves of Target and other stores where it might be selected by grandmas shopping for their grandkids. absolutely every aspect of playing the game is at once instantly understandable and agreeably fun – right down to how those tiles feel in your hand." [7]

Azul has won a number of board gaming awards and received numerous nominations:

  1. 2018 Spiel des Jahres award [8][9]
  2. 2018 Origins Award for Best Family Game and Fan Favorite [10]
  3. 2018 Dice Tower Award for Best Family Game [11]
  4. 2018 As d'Or – Jeu de l'Année Winner [12]
  5. 2018 Mensa Select Certification [13]
  6. 2017 Meeples' Choice Nominee [14]
  7. 2017 Cardboard Republic Architect Laurel Winner [15]
  8. 2017 Golden Geek Best Family Game of the Year [16]
  9. 2017 Golden Geek Board Game of the Year Runner-up [16]

Plan B Games has released a second title in the Azul line, Azul: Stained Glass of Sintra, which increases the game's complexity via clear tiles and two sided window panes on the player boards. [17]

A third game in the series, Azul: Summer Pavilion, was released in the fall of 2019. [18]


Organizations and publications who award board Game of the Year awards include:

American Tabletop Awards Edit

These are winners of the American Tabletop Awards, a US-based board game award selected by a committee of board game media creators for games released in the previous calendar year. [1]

These are winners in the Early Gamers category, a category targeted at people new to board games.

Year Winner Designer(s) Publisher
2021 [2] Abandon All Artichokes Emma Larkins Gamewright
2020 [3] Draftosaurus Antoine Bauza, Corentin Lebrat, Ludovic Maublanc, Théo Rivière Ankama
2019 [4] Catch the Moon Fabien Riffaud & Juan Rodriguez Studio Bombyx

These are winners in the Casual Games category, a category intended for gamers of all experience levels.

Year Winner Designer(s) Publisher
2021 [5] The Crew: The Quest for Planet Nine Thomas Sing KOSMOS
2020 [6] ShipShape Rob Daviau Calliope Games
2019 [7] The Quacks of Quedlinburg Wolfgang Warsch North Star Games

These are winners in the Strategy Games category, a category for games that have additional "complexity, planning requirements, and duration" [8] compared to Casual Games.

Year Winner Designer(s) Publisher
2021 [9] Calico Kevin Russ Flatout Games, Alderac Entertainment Group
2020 [10] Wingspan Elizabeth Hargrave Stonemaier Games
2019 [11] Chronicles of Crime David Cicurel Lucky Duck Games

These are winners in the Complex Games category, a category intended for "longer-form games that typically appeal to more experienced players". [12]

Year Winner Designer(s) Publisher
2021 [13] Dominations: Road to Civilization Éric Dubus, Olivier Melison Holy Grail Games
2020 [14] The Taverns of Tiefenthal Wolfgang Warsch North Star Games
2019 [15] Root Cole Wehrle Leder Games

As d'Or / Golden Ace Edit

These are winners of As d'Or Award, for the best board games of the year submitted at the Cannes International Game Festival

To be continued

Year Category Winner Designer(s) Publisher
2020 As d'Or Jeu de l'année Oriflamme Adrien Hesling, Axel Hesling Studio H
2019 As d'Or Jeu de l'année The Mind Wolfgang Warsch Oya
2018 As d'Or Jeu de l'année Azul Michael Kiesling Plan B Games
2017 As d'Or Jeu de l'année Unlock! Cyril Demaegd et Thomas Cauët et Alice Carroll Space Cowboys
2016 As d'Or Jeu de l'année Mysterium Oleg Sidorenko et Oleksandr Nevskiy Libellud
2015 As d'Or Jeu de l'année Colt Express Christophe Raimbault Ludonaute
2015 As d'Or Jeu de l'année Grand Prix Five Tribes Bruno Cathala Days of Wonder
2015 As d'Or Jeu de l'année Enfant La Chasse aux Gigamons Karim Aouidad, Johann Roussel Elemon Games
2015 As d'Or Jeu de l'année Prix du Jury Loony Quest Laurent Escoffier, David Franck Libellud

Board Game Quest Awards Edit

These are winners of the Board Game Quest Game of the Year Award. This award is presented to the best board game of the year from the Board Game Quest editorial team, a United States based board game media outlet.

Year Winner Designer Publisher
2018 Root Cole Wehrle Leder Games
2017 Clans of Caledonia Juma Al-JouJou Karma Games
2016 Terraforming Mars Jacob Fryxelius Stronghold Games
2015 Pandemic Legacy Rob Daviau, Matt Leacock Z-Man Games
2014 Five Tribes Bruno Cathala Days of Wonder
2013 Nations Rustan Håkansson, Nina Håkansson, Einar Rosén, Robert Rosén Lautapelit.fi

Deutscher Spiele Preis Edit

The Deutscher Spiele Preis (German for German Game Prize) is an important award for boardgames. It was started in 1990 by the German magazine "Die Pöppel-Revue", which collects votes from the industry's stores, magazines, professionals and game clubs. The results are announced every October at the Spiel game fair in Essen, Germany. The Essen Feather is awarded at the same ceremony.

Year Winner Designer(s) Publisher
2019 Wingspan Elizabeth Hargrave Stonemaier Games
2018 Azul Michael Kiesling Plan B Games
2017 Terraforming Mars Jacob Fryxelius Stronghold Games
2016 Mombasa Alexander Pfister
2015 The Voyages of Marco Polo Simone Luciani, Daniele Tascini Hans im Glück Verlags-GmbH
2014 Russian Railroads Helmut Ohley, Leonhard "Lonny" Orgler Hans im Glück Verlags-GmbH
2013 Terra Mystica Jens Drögemüller, Helge Ostertag Feuerland Spiele
2012 Village Inka Brand, Markus Brand Pegasus Spiele
2011 7 Wonders Antoine Bauza Repos Production
2010 Fresco Marcel Süßelbeck, Marco Ruskowski, Wolfgang Panning Queen Games
2009 Dominion Donald X. Vaccarino Hans im Glück Verlags-GmbH
2008 Agricola Uwe Rosenberg Lookout Games
2007 The Pillars of the Earth Michael Rieneck, Stefan Stadler Kosmos
2006 Caylus William Attia Ystari Games
2005 Louis XIV Rüdiger Dorn Ravensburger Spieleverlag GmbH
2004 Saint Petersburg Bernd Brunnhofer Hans im Glück Verlags-GmbH
2003 Amun-Re Reiner Knizia Hans im Glück Verlags-GmbH
2002 Puerto Rico Andreas Seyfarth Ravensburger Spieleverlag GmbH
2001 Carcassonne Klaus-Jürgen Wrede Hans im Glück Verlags-GmbH
2000 Taj Mahal Reiner Knizia alea
1999 Tikal Michael Kiesling, Wolfgang Kramer Ravensburger Spieleverlag GmbH
1998 Tigris and Euphrates Reiner Knizia Hans im Glück Verlags-GmbH
1997 Löwenherz Klaus Teuber Goldsieber Spiele
1996 El Grande Richard Ulrich, Wolfgang Kramer Hans im Glück Verlags-GmbH
1995 The Settlers of Catan Klaus Teuber Franckh
1994 Take 6! Wolfgang Kramer AMIGO Spiel + Freizeit GmbH
1993 Modern Art Reiner Knizia Hans im Glück Verlags-GmbH
1992 Flying Dutchman Klaus Teuber Parker Brothers
1991 Master Labyrinth Max J. Kobbert Ravensburger Spieleverlag GmbH
1990 Hoity Toity Klaus Teuber F.X. Schmid

Diamond Climber Awards Edit

These are winners of The Diamond Climber Awards, for the best board games of the year submitted by Meeple Mountain, a United States based board game media outlet. [16]

Year Category Winner Designer(s) Publisher
2020 Game of the Year Calico Kevin Russ Flatout Games
2020 Best Heavy Strategy / Euro Game On Mars Vital Lacerda Eagle-Gryphon Games
2020 Best Two Player Game The Shores of Tripoli Kevin Bertram Fort Circle Games
2020 Best Solo Game Under Falling Skies Tomáš Uhlíř Czech Games Edition
2020 Best Coop Game Gloomhaven: Jaws of the Lion Isaac Childres Cephalofair Games
2020 Best Family Game Calico Kevin Russ Flatout Games
2020 Best Light Game Village Green Peer Sylvester Osprey Games
2020 Best Artwork On Mars Vital Lacerda Eagle-Gryphon Games
2019 Game of the Year Wingspan Elizabeth Hargrave Stonemaier Games
2019 Best Gateway Game Tiny Towns Peter McPherson Alderac Entertainment Group
2019 Best Family Game Tiny Towns Peter McPherson Alderac Entertainment Group
2019 Best Artwork Wingspan Elizabeth Hargrave Stonemaier Games
2019 Best Two Player Game SHŌBU Jamie Sajdak, Manolis Vranas Smirk & Laughter Games
2019 Best Thematic Game Horrified Prospero Hall Ravensburger Spieleverlag GmbH
2019 Best RPG Star Crossed Alex Roberts Bully Pulpit Games
2019 Best Light Game Point Salad Molly Johnson, Robert Melvin, Shawn Stankewich Alderac Entertainment Group
2019 Best Euro Game Paladins of the West Kingdom Shem Phillips Renegade Game Studios
2019 Best Coop Game Horrified Prospero Hall Ravensburger Spieleverlag GmbH
2018 Game of the Year Root Cole Wehrle Leder Games
2018 Best Gateway Game Reef Emerson Matsuuchi Next Move Games
2018 Best Thematic Game Who Goes There? Anthony Coffey, Jesse Labbe Certifiable Studios
2018 Best Euro Game Coimbra Flaminia Brasini, Virginio Gigli eggertspiele
2018 Best RPG Kids on Bikes Jonathan Gilmour, Doug Levandowski Renegade Game Studios
2018 Best Filler Game The Mind Wolfgang Warsch Nürnberger-Spielkarten-Verlag
2018 Best Family Game Drop It Bernhard Lach, Uwe Rapp KOSMOS
2018 Best Coop Game Chronicles of Crime David Cicurel Lucky Duck Games
2018 Best Artwork Root Cole Wehrle Leder Games

Dice Tower Annual Awards Edit

ENnie Awards Edit

The annual ENnie Awards (previously known as the Gen Con EN World RPG Awards) are annual, fan-based awards for role-playing game products and publishers hosted at Gen Con in Indianapolis, Indiana. The name of the award is derived from the EN World web site that hosted the awards from their inception in 2001 until 2018, and retains the name, although is no longer part of EN World. [17] The ENnies were created by Russ Morrissey and Eric Noah and were run and owned by Morrissey until 2018. [18]

Jogo do Ano Edit

These are winners of the Jogo do Ano, for the best board games of the year submitted to Spiel Portugal.

Year Winner Designer(s) Publisher
2018 Lisboa Vital Lacerda Eagle-Gryphon Games
2017 Great Western Trail Alexander Pfister Stronghold Games
2016 Mombasa Alexander Pfister eggertspiele & Pegasus Spiele
2015 La Granja Michael Keller and Andreas Odendahl Spielworxx
2014 Nations Rustan Håkansson, Nina Håkansson, Einar Rosén and Robert Rosén Lautapelit.fi
2012 Keyflower Sebastian Bleasdale and Richard Breese R&D Games
2011 Ora et Labora Uwe Rosenberg Lookout Games
2010 Troyes Sébastien Dujardin, Xavier Georges and Alain Orban Z-Man Games
2009 Maria Richard Sivél Histogame
2008 Agricola Uwe Rosenberg Lookout Games
2007 Brass Martin Wallace Eagle-Gryphon Games
2006 Imperial Mac Gerdts eggertspiele

Games magazine Edit

The winners of the Games (magazine) Game of the Year are chosen by Games editors: [19]

Year Game of the Year Designer(s) Publisher
2014 Garden Dice/The Card Expansion Doug Bass Meridae Games
2013 Trajan Stefan Feld Ammonit Spiele
2012 Tikal II: The Lost Temple Wolfgang Kramer and Michael Kiesling Asmodée Editions
2011 Jump Gate Matt Worden Matt Worden Games
2010 Small World Philippe Keyaerts Days of Wonder
2009 Tzaar Kris Burm Rio Grande Games
2008 Pillars of the Earth Michael Rieneck and Stefan Stadler Mayfair Games
2007 [20] Vegas Showdown Henry Stern Avalon Hill
2006 [21] Australia Wolfgang Kramer and Michael Kiesling Rio Grande Games
2005 [22] BuyWord Sid Sackson Face2Face Games
2004 [23] New England Alan Moon and Aaron Weissblum Überplay
2003 [24] DVONN Kris Burm Rio Grande
2002 Evo Philippe Keyaerts Eurogames-Descartes USA
2001 Aladdin's Dragons Richard Breese Rio Grande
2000 [25] Torres Wolfgang Kramer and Michael Kiesling Rio Grande
1999 [26] Fossil Klaus Palesch Rio Grande
1998 [26] Quoridor Mirko Marchesi Great American Trading Co.
1997 [27] 25 Words or Less Winning Moves
1995 [28] Sharp Shooters Milton Bradley
1994 [28] Myst Robyn Miller and Rand Miller Broderbund
1993 [28] Inklings Mattel
1992 [28] Pipeline Playco Hawaii
1991 [28] Trumpet International Games

Golden Geek Award Edit

The BoardGameGeek Golden Geek Award was originally presented at the BGG.CON event in November, but is currently announced annually in March. The winners of the Golden Geek are selected by the nomination and voting of the user community of BoardGameGeek.com website. [29]

Year Winner Designer(s) Publisher
2019 Wingspan Elizabeth Hargrave Stonemaier Games
2018 Root Cole Wehrle Leder Games
2017 Gloomhaven Isaac Childres Cephalofair Games
2016 Scythe Jamey Stegmaier Stonemaier Games
2015 Pandemic Legacy: Season 1 Matt Leacock, Rob Daviau Z-Man Games
2014 Splendor Marc André Space Cowboys
2013 Terra Mystica Helge Ostertag, Jens Drögemüller Feuerland Spiele
2012 Eclipse Touko Tahkokallio Lautapelit.fi
2011 Dominant Species Chad Jensen GMT Games
2010 Hansa Teutonica Andreas Steding Argentum Verlag
2009 Dominion Donald X. Vaccarino Rio Grande Games
2008 Agricola Uwe Rosenberg Lookout Games
2007 Shogun Dirk Henn Queen Games
2006 Caylus William Attia Ẏstari Games

Mensa Select Edit

These are winners of Mensa Select Award, for the five best board games of the year submitted to Mensa Mind Games

2015 Trekking the National Parks Charlie Bink Bink Inc LLC
2015 Letter Tycoon Brad Brooks Breaking Games
2015 Lanterns: The Harvest Festival Christopher Chung Renegade Game Studio
2015 Dragonwood :A Game of Dice & Daring Darren Kisgen Gamewright Inc.
2015 Castles of Mad King Ludwig Ted Alspach Bezier Games
2014 Euphoria Jamie Stegmaier Stonemaier Games
2014 Gravwell: Escape from the 9th Dimension Corey Young Cryptozoic Entertainment
2014 Pyramix Tim Roediger Gamewright
2014 Qwixx Steffen Benndorf Gamewright
2014 The Duke Jeremy Holcomb Catalyst Game Labs
2013 Forbidden Desert Matt Leacock Gamewright
2013 Ghooost! Richard Garfield Iello
2013 Kerflip Damon Tabb Creative Foundry Games
2013 Kulami Andreas Kuhnekath Foxmind Games
2013 Suburbia Ted Alspach Bezier Games
2012 Coerceo Erik Gortzen Coerceo Company
2012 Iota Gene Mackles Iota
2012 Mine Shift John Forte, Jr Mindware
2012 Snake Oil Jeff Ochs Snake Oil, LLC
2012 Tetris Link (Uncredited) TechnoSource
2011 Instructures Jane Mathews Jane's Games
2011 Pastiche Sean D MacDonald Gryphon Games
2011 Pirate vs Pirate Max Winter Osterhaus Out of the Box
2011 Stomple Greg Zima GaZima Games
2011 Uncle Chestnut's Table Gype Paul E Nowak and Christopher Nowak Eternal Revolution
2010 Anomia Andrew Innes Anomia Press
2010 Dizios Nicholas Cravotta MindWare
2010 Forbidden Island Matt Leacock Gamewright
2010 Word on the Street Jack Degnan Out of the Box
2010 Yikerz! (Uncredited) Wiggles 3D Incorporated
2009 Cornerstone Matt Mette Good Company Games
2009 Dominion Donald X Vaccarino Rio Grande Games
2009 Marrakech Dominique Ehrhard Fundex
2009 Stratum Jose' L Navas Family Games America, Inc
2009 Tic-Tac-Ku Mark Asperheim and Cris Van Oosterum Mad Cave Bird Games
2008 AmuseAmaze Ethan Goffman HL Games
2008 Eye Know Paul Berton and George Sinclair Wiggles 3D Inc
2008 Jumbulaya Julie Archer and Karl Archer Platypus Games
2008 Pixel Ariel Laden Educational Insights
2008 Tiki Topple Keith Meyers Gamewright
2007 Gemlok Donald Meyer Pywacket Games
2007 Gheos Rene' Wiersma Z-Man Games
2007 Hit or Miss Garrett J Donner, Brian S Spence, and Michael S Steer Gamewright
2007 Qwirkle Susan McKinley Ross MindWare
2007 Skullduggery K Allegra Vernon Outset Media Games
2006 Deflexion (aka Khet) Luke Hooper, Michael Larson, and Del Segura Deflexion
2006 Hive John Yianni Smart Zone Games
2006 Keesdrow Donald Meyer Pywacket
2006 Pentago Tomas Floden Mindtwister USA
2006 Wits & Wagers Dominic Crapuchettes North Star Games
2005 DaVinci's Challenge Paul Micarelli Briarpatch
2005 Ingenious Reiner Knizia Fantasy Flight Games
2005 Loot Reiner Knizia Gamewright
2005 Niagara Thomas Liesching Rio Grande Games
2005 Zendo Kory Heath Looney Labs
2004 10 Days in Africa/USA Alan Moon and Aaron Weissblum Out of the Box
2004 Basari Reinhard Staupe Out of the Box
2004 The Bridges of Shangri-La Leo Colovini Uberplay Entertainment
2004 Rumis Stefan Kogl Educational Insights
2004 Yinsh Kris Burm Rio Grande Games
2003 Blokus Bernard Tavitian Educational Insights
2003 Cityscape Sjaak Griffioen Out of the Box
2003 Fire & Ice Jens-Peter Schliemann Out of the Box
2003 Octiles Dale Walton Out of the Box
2003 TransAmerica Franz-Benno Delonge Rio Grande Games
2002 Curses! Brian Tinsman Play All Day Games
2002 Dvonn Kris Burm Rio Grande Games
2002 The Legend of Landlock Edith Schlichting Gamewright
2002 Muggins! (Uncredited) Muggins Math
2002 Smart Mouth Theo Coster, Ora Coster, and Theora Design Binary Arts
2001 Brainstrain DJ Calhoun Chuckle Games Company
2001 Dao Jeff Pickering and Ben VanBuskirk Playdao.com
2001 Metro Dirk Henn Queen Games
2001 Shapes Up! (Uncredited) Educational Insights
2001 The Poll Game Eric Martin and Jeff Snow Thepollgame, LLC
2000 3 Stones Andy Daniel Enginuity Games
2000 Finish Lines Joan Moravick Games For All Reasons
2000 Imaginiff Jack Lawson and Andrew Lawson Buffalo Games
2000 Time's Up! Peter Sarrett R&R Games
2000 Zertz Kris Burm Schmidt International/Rio Grande Games
1999 Apples to Apples Matthew Kirby Out of the Box
1999 Bollox (Boku) Rob Nelson Cadaco
1999 Doubles Wild Andy Daniel Enginuity Games
1999 Fluxx Andrew Looney Looney Labs
1999 Quiddler Marsha Falco Set Enterprises
1998 Avalam Philippe Deweys Great American Trading Company
1998 Cube Checkers Gillespie and Rolling DCP Limited
1998 Kram Mark Blazczyk Du Botting Originals
1998 Spy Alley William Stephenson Spy Alley Partners
1998 Wadjet Dee Pomerleau Timbuk II
1997 Hattrick! Björn Holmér US Games Systems
1997 Quoridor Mirko Marchesi Great American Trading Company
1997 Rush Hour Nob Yoshigahara Think Fun (Binary Arts)
1997 Sagarian Jason Yearout Sagarian
1997 Stops Don Kimball Stops
1996 Pirateer Scott Peterson Mendocino Game Company
1996 Quadwrangle Maureen Hiron Great American Trading Company
1996 Rat-a-Tat Cat Ann and Monty Stambler Gamewright
1996 Take 6! Wolfgang Kramer US Games Systems
1996 Touche' Wayne Bobette Wayne Bobette Enterprises
1995 Continuo Maureen Hiron US Games Systems
1995 Duo Maureen Hiron US Games Systems
1995 Quixo Thierry Chapeau Great American Trading Company
1995 The Great Dalmuti Richard Garfield Wizards of the Coast
1995 Word Spin Scramble Geospace Products Co, Inc
1994 Char Frank Bechter Bechter Productions, Inc.
1994 Chung Toi W. Reginald Chung House of Chung Enterprises
1994 Down Fall Western Publishing, Inc.
1994 Magic: The Gathering Richard Garfield Wizards of the Coast
1994 Pyraos (aka Pylos) David G. Royffe Great American Trading Co.
1993 Farook Stewart M. Lamle Amuse, Inc..
1993 Inklings Mattel
1993 Overturn Ron and Pat Dubren Pressman
1993 Quadrature Mark Steere Mark Steere Games
1993 Quarto! Blaise Muller Gigamic
1992 Kinesis Adam Byer Cherry Street Games
1992 Q4 Abalone Games Corp
1992 Terrace Anton Dresden Siler/Siler Ventures
1992 Traverse Michael Kuby, John Miller Educational Insights
1992 Why Not? Herman Erikson Our Game Company
1991 Clue: The Great Museum Caper John Labelle, Thomas and Dave Rabideau Parker Brothers
1991 Lapis Pango, Inc
1991 Master Labyrinth Max J. Kobbert International Playthings
1991 Pyramis Murray J. Gould, James R. Longacre Abalone Games Corp
1991 Set Marsha J. Falco Set Enterprises
1990 Abalone Michael Lalet, Laurent Levi Abalone Games Corp
1990 Scattergories Milton Bradley
1990 Taboo Brian Hersch Milton Bradley
1990 Tribond Ed Muccini, Tim Walsh, Dave Yearick Big Fun A Go-Go
1990 Trivial Pursuit, Genus Edition Scott Abbot, Chris Haney Parker Brothers

Origin Awards Edit

The Origins Awards are American awards for outstanding work in the game industry. They are presented by the Academy of Adventure Gaming Arts and Design at the Origins Game Fair on an annual basis for the previous year, so (for example) the 1979 awards were given at the 1980 Origins. The categories for the Origins award can vary from year to year, and there is not a "Game of the Year" per se.

The Origins Award is commonly referred to as a Calliope, as the statuette is in the likeness of the muse of the same name. Academy members frequently shorten this name to "Callie."

Spiel des Jahres Edit

These are winners of Spiel des Jahres, the German board game award.

Year Winner Designer Publisher
2020 Pictures Daniela Stöhr and Christian Stöhr PD-Verlag and Rio Grande Games
2019 Just One Ludovic Roudy & Bruno Sautter Repos Production
2018 Azul Michael Kiesling Next Move/Plan B Games
2017 Kingdomino Bruno Cathala Blue Orange Games
2016 Codenames Vlaada Chvátil Czech Games Edition
2015 Colt Express Christophe Raimbault Ludonaute
2014 Camel Up Steffen Bogen Eggertspiele
2013 Hanabi Antoine Bauza Asmodée Éditions
2012 Kingdom Builder Donald X. Vaccarino Queen Games
2011 Qwirkle Susan McKinley Ross Mindware
2010 Dixit Jean-Louis Roubira Libellud
2009 Dominion Donald X. Vaccarino Rio Grande Games
2008 Keltis Reiner Knizia Kosmos
2007 Zooloretto Michael Schacht Abacus Spiele
2006 Thurn and Taxis Andreas Seyfarth and Karen Seyfarth Hans im Glück
2005 Niagara Thomas Liesching Zoch Verlag
2004 Ticket to Ride Alan R. Moon Days of Wonder
2003 Alhambra Dirk Henn Queen Games
2002 Villa Paletti Bill Payne Zoch Verlag
2001 Carcassonne Klaus-Jürgen Wrede Hans im Glück
2000 Torres Wolfgang Kramer and Michael Kiesling Ravensburger
1999 Tikal Wolfgang Kramer and Michael Kiesling Ravensburger
1998 Elfenland Alan R. Moon Amigo Spiele
1997 Mississippi Queen Werner Hodel Goldsieber
1996 El Grande Wolfgang Kramer and Richard Ulrich Hans im Glück
1995 The Settlers of Catan Klaus Teuber Kosmos
1994 Manhattan Andreas Seyfarth Hans im Glück
1993 Call My Bluff Richard Borg F.X. Schmid
1992 Um Reifenbreite Rob Bontenbal Jumbo
1991 Drunter und Drüber Klaus Teuber Hans im Glück
1990 Hoity Toity Klaus Teuber F.X. Schmid
1989 Café International Rudi Hoffmann Mattel
1988 Barbarossa Klaus Teuber Altenburger und Stralsunder
1987 Auf Achse Wolfgang Kramer F.X. Schmid
1986 Top Secret Spies Wolfgang Kramer Ravensburger
1985 Sherlock Holmes: Consulting Detective Raymond Edwards, Suzanne Goldberg and Gary Grady Kosmos
1984 Railway Rivals David Watts Schmidt Spiele
1983 Scotland Yard Werner Schlegel, Dorothy Garrels, Fritz Ifland, Manfred Burggraf, Werner Scheerer and Wolf Hoermann Ravensburger
1982 Enchanted Forest Alex Randolph and Michel Matschoss Ravensburger
1981 Focus Sid Sackson Parker
1980 Rummikub Ephraim Hertzano Intelli
1979 Hare and Tortoise David Parlett Ravensburger

Kennerspiel des Jahres Edit

These are winners of Kennerspiel des Jahres, an expansion of the German Spiel des Jahres board game award starting in 2011. It translates to "connoisseur/expert game of the year" and is meant for more experienced gamers.

Year Winner Designer(s) Publisher
2019 Wingspan Elizabeth Hargrave Stonemaier Games
2018 Die Quacksalber von Quedlinburg ("The Quacks of Quedlinburg") Wolfgang Warsch Schmidt Spiele
2017 EXIT: The Game Inka Brand, Markus Brand KOSMOS
2016 Isle of Skye Andreas Pelikan, Alexander Pfister Mayfair Games
2015 Broom Service Andreas Pelikan, Alexander Pfister alea, Ravensburger
2014 Istanbul Rüdiger Dorn Pegasus Spiele
2013 Legends of Andor Michael Menzel Fantasy Flight Games
2012 Village Inka Brand and Markus Brand Pegasus Spiele
2011 7 Wonders Antoine Bauza Repos Production

Kinderspiel des Jahres Edit

The Kinderspiel des Jahres is awarded every year to the best children's game by a jury of German game critics. This award is to children's games what the Spiel des Jahres is to family games.

2001 was the first year that the Kinderspiel des Jahres was officially awarded. Prior to that year, it was the Sonderpreis "Kinderspiel" (Special Prize for Best Children's Game). Since the intent behind both awards is the same, it is customary to refer to the 1989–2000 Sonderpreis winners as having won the Kinderspiel des Jahres.


Board games offered budget-friendly entertainment.

1930s ad for Parker Brothers Monopoly.

No one felt more surprised by the board game boom at the time than than Parker Brothers executives. With most American household budgets buckling, it felt only logical to game industry executives that retail, particularly for diversionary products, would plunge along with the Dow Jones Industrial Average.

Then, and now, there are many reasons why board games remain a bright spot in economic downturns, typically bleak spots for retailers. Board games are relatively cheap, reusable and can entertain a wide age range. One Monopoly board can keep a family occupied for many evenings, a plus considering the budget-stretching demands of the moment.

Another theory: people stayed in. Edward Parker, the grandnephew of the founder, George Parker, recalled years later, 𠇍uring the Depression, people did not have enough money to go out to the shows . . . So they stayed home and played Monopoly.”

The game not only provided cheap entertainment, it also offered a psychological elixir, as Parker said, it gave people 𠇊 feeling of wealth.” 𠇋ut what kept it going is the chance for individual gain. It appeals to the competitive nature of people,” he said. “The player can always say to himself, ‘I’m going to get the better of the other guy.’ People also can play Monopoly without it being the end of the world. Sort of a release from the tensions of everyday life.”

Board games in America date back to the earliest Native American communities and became more commercially marketed in the mid-19th century as Milton Bradley and Parker Brothers grew their respective businesses in Salem, Massachusetts. But unlike previous economic crashes, indoor lighting was more ubiquitous during the Great Depression and offered a boon to the indoor recreation world. And with many people out of work, there was more time to kill than ever.


Bring Your Passion for a Game to the Next Level

There are some board games that have a large group of dedicated and diehard fans. These people throw parties dedicated to playing and celebrating the game. One such game is called Settlers of Catan. This blogger took his love for the game to the next level by sculpting a completely original version of the game. Now that's dedication!


The Pro-Union Civil War Board Game That Was the Chutes and Ladders of 1862

In 1862, a year into the Civil War, the Philadelphia publishing company Charlton & Althrop registered a trademark for this optimistic and bellicose “Game of Secession, or Sketches of the Rebellion.” The four-color game board is a collage of small patriotic scenes, portraits of Union and Confederate generals, and cartoons mocking the Confederate cause.

Printed 19 years after the publication of the first board game in the United States, this game’s method of play is simple: Using two dice or a “tee-to-tum,” players advanced the number of spaces dictated by their throw. Unlike the multitude of Civil War–themed board games in today’s market, this game has no element of strategy, nor does it test the player’s knowledge of the military or political scene of the time.

Players can land on spaces that celebrate Union victories and jump ahead, or have the bad luck to land on a Confederate-themed space and be sent back. The player advancing to space 71, which depicts a Zouave Union infantryman in hand-to-hand conflict with a mounted Confederate cavalry officer, could jump 28 spaces to celebrate the Zouave’s bravery.

Meanwhile, the Confederate illustrations often mock the other side’s leaders or armies. In space 79, for instance, “Mrs. Columbia” (a stand-in symbolizing the Union) holds a little “Jeff Davis” and shows him his “Christmas Tree”—growing out of a bucket labeled “rebellion,” it’s a leafless stick festooned with snakes. Landing on this spot could set a luckless player back by 44 spaces.

Thanks to N. Sweet for the suggestion. Click on the image below to zoom, or visit the game’s page in the New York State Library digital archives.


Board game

A board game is a game usually played with pieces on a board, or some area with marked spaces.

Most board games use pieces that may be moved, placed, or traded depending on the rules of the game. These pieces may be money, chips, pawns, or other objects. Board games may often involve some random chance with dice or cards. There are many board games with a long history in some cultures. Examples of these games are chess, checkers, backgammon, parqués, and go. There are also a great number of popular board games that have been created more recently, in the past hundred years. Among these games are Scrabble and Monopoly.

Chess, and most versions of checkers, are played on a 8x8 square board with 32 white squares and 32 black squares. International checkers is played on a 10x10 square board. [1]

Older than chess, but not by much, is tafl (pronounced 'tabl'), later called "hneftafl". This is an old Norse board game with just two types of pieces. [2] [3] Its pieces, when found in Britain, have often been wrongly ascribed to chess. In chess, of course, the board is different, and there are six kinds of pieces.


Monopoly

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Monopoly, real-estate board game for two to eight players, in which the player’s goal is to remain financially solvent while forcing opponents into bankruptcy by buying and developing pieces of property.

What is the game of Monopoly?

Monopoly is a real-estate board game for two to eight players. The player’s goal is to remain financially solvent while forcing opponents into bankruptcy by buying and developing pieces of property. Bankruptcy results in elimination from the game. The last player remaining on the board is the winner.

Who designed Monopoly?

The Monopoly board game was the brainchild of Charles B. Darrow, an unemployed heating engineer who sold the concept of the game to Parker Brothers in 1935.

Where did the game Monopoly originate?

Monopoly is derived from the Landlord’s Game, a board game designed and patented by Lizzie G. Magie in 1904. She revised and renewed the patent on her game in 1924. The version Magie originated did not involve the concept of a monopoly. Monopoly gained popularity in the United States during the Great Depression.

Each side of the square board is divided into 10 small rectangles representing specific properties, railroads, utilities, a jail, and various other places and events. At the start of the game, each player is given a fixed amount of play money the players then move around the board according to the throw of a pair of dice. Any player who lands on an unowned property may buy it, but, if he or she lands on a property owned by another player, rent must be paid to that player. Certain nonproperty squares require the player landing on them to draw a card that may be favourable or unfavourable. If a player acquires a monopoly—that is, all of a particular group of properties—that player may purchase improvements for those properties improvements add substantially to a property’s rental fee. A player continues to travel around the board until he or she is bankrupt. Bankruptcy results in elimination from the game. The last player remaining on the board is the winner.

Monopoly, which is the best-selling privately patented board game in history, gained popularity in the United States during the Great Depression when Charles B. Darrow, an unemployed heating engineer, sold the concept to Parker Brothers in 1935. Before then, homemade versions of a similar game had circulated in many parts of the United States. Most were based on the Landlord’s Game, a board game designed and patented by Lizzie G. Magie in 1904. She revised and renewed the patent on her game in 1924. Notably, the version Magie originated did not involve the concept of a monopoly for her, the point of the game was to illustrate the potential exploitation of tenants by greedy landlords. Magie used the Landlord’s Game to promote a remedy for such exploitation—namely, the single tax on property owners, a leading social issue among those who criticized land speculation as a cause of economic injustice.

The Landlord’s Game was still circulating in the early 1900s as a handmade board game, and other variations emerged that incorporated the monopolization of properties. Among those promoting this version were the brothers Louis and Fred Thun, who abandoned their patent attempt in 1931 when records of Magie’s 1904 patent came to light, and Dan Layman, who named his game Finance but, like the Thuns, did not patent it. Darrow drew upon the earlier models, successfully marketing his version of Monopoly to retailers in the northeastern United States between 1933 and 1934. Demand soon overwhelmed his ability to mass-produce the game sets, but it took repeated efforts to convince Parker Brothers of the game’s merit. Once the company acquired the game from Darrow, Parker Brothers promoted Monopoly as the brainchild of an out-of-work engineer seeking an affordable means of entertainment during a time of economic hardship. Lawsuits from others claiming to have invented Monopoly were settled by Parker Brothers.

Monopoly became popular in many other parts of the world. In the original North American sets, the properties were named for streets in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Notable among these is Marvin Gardens, which is a misspelling of the real Marven Gardens in Atlantic City. Sets marketed in other countries may be modified to represent a local city for example, London streets are used in the British version. Monopoly games also have been licensed with other North American cities as the subject (e.g., Chicago) prominent local landmarks and points of interest usually replace street names as properties.

The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica This article was most recently revised and updated by Adam Augustyn, Managing Editor, Reference Content.